gimme dat ip

So there’s something I use quite often to get the public IP of the host I’m using:

  • curl icanhazip.com
  • curl checkip.amazonaws.com

And now, introducing the new and improved (unlikely), dbag.tech IP returning URL. It has bells, it has whistles, it can clean and buff your car.

DBAG Tech Get IP

The idea is the following:

  • Client sends HTTP GET request for /getip
  • NGINX Docker container matches request path, and sends to explicit location match that does a proxypass to another internal Docker container
  • Sinatra web app with the following code
set :bind, '0.0.0.0'

get '/' do
  "#{request.ip}"
end

Some additional updates to my NGINX container:

  • Enabled HTTP2 (https://www.nginx.com/blog/nginx-1-9-5/)
  • Enabled HSTS (https://www.nginx.com/blog/http-strict-transport-security-hsts-and-nginx/)
  • Updated restart command for container due to not using a load balancer (cleaned up one liner for easier reading)
for i in $(aws ecs list-tasks --cluster cluster | jq -r .taskArns[]);
  do
  GROUP=$(aws ecs describe-tasks --cluster cluster --tasks $i | jq -r .tasks[].group);
  if [ "$GROUP" = "service:website" ]; then
    aws ecs stop-task --cluster cluster --task $i;
  else
    continue;
  fi;
done

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starting something new

So I’ve definitely decided to make a game. The idea is a 2D side scroller fighting game. It doesn’t look like it will be easy, and it will probably be terrible in the beginning – but I don’t care. I’ll try to put forth what I forsee the game being:

  • 2D platform game
  • Low, Medium, High, and Power attacks
  • Blocking, Parrying, Riposting, Dodging, Rolling
  • Less enemies, more difficult combat
  • Environmental hazards
  • Lots of vulgarity

Below is a display of my artistic talent. Gaze in awe.

Shitty Skeleton
skeleton

Obviously when I have additional content I will display it here for all to see. Oh you want to steal my assets? Go nuts ya douche.

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music i cannot find

It’s funny how little we realize when things happen over a long period of time.

Do you remember listening to the music you enjoyed as a kid, and then hearing what your parents listened to? It was awful. I’m not sure why we don’t like the music, some do, but I think for the most part it just sounds like old people music.

The music we listen to as kids and young adults is frowned on by adults for the most part. After some time, we become those adults and only enjoy what we already know. It’s not that we don’t hear new songs and enjoy them, but finding new music like you are able to when you are young seems much easier.

Where did I end up in this cluster fuck? I have come to like certain old people music, relative to my own timeline. The problem I face now is finding new music that moves me in the same way.

Is it because we lose our imagination and naivety as we get older, and can’t feel the music in the same way? The last new artist I really enjoyed was Rodrigo y Gabriela. What an amazing performance these people put on.

– UPDATE: I am removing the embedded video due to horrible things and crappy performance. Instead I will simply link to it.

Rodrigo y Gabriela- “Hanuman” OFFICIAL

Please enjoy. Maybe it will inspire you to find something new. I shall continue the search and post here if and when I find something worthy. I should really get around to enabling comments to get some feedback, though I don’t think anyone but me reads this shit.

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dbag tech updates

I’ve had to modify the theme a little bit, and this is an attempt (other than storing the diffs in Git) to document what I’ve changed and why.

  1. Disabled fade-in CSS
  2. Disabled word-wrap on syntax highlight code blocks

The reason for #1 is because it made loading the site seem delayed. The whole point of a static site is to load as fast as possible (for me at least). It upset me greatly that this feature was enabled and went against the purpose I was after for this blog. It was fairly straight forward to disable though, and after modifying _sass/_general.scss it loaded without the fade-in effects. Big money!

The reason for #2 should be obvious, and while the creator of the theme must understand programming in some way, it surprises me this was enabled by default. Basically when showing code blocks it would wrap lines, making single line text unreadable. The code blocks themselves looked ugly, and it needed to change. Thankfully someone had already been through this with Jekyll highlighting and it was easy to fix by adding a single line of CSS. I also needed to comment out a line as well, but it works great and functions exactly how I would want a code block to work. Success!

I feel like I should put the actual examples of the code I’ve disabled/added, but I’m tired and I really don’t want to look it up.

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updated pipeline

I’ve updated this blog to use a new Jekyll theme, as well as the CICD pipeline for automated delivery. I hacked together a method of replacing the ECS Container task without the load balancer, though it may result in badly cached responses. Still looking for the best way to handle this without paying Amazon extra load balancing fees.

The updated pipeline includes the following:

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